Tag Archives: fusion mineral paint

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

 

First, let’s talk about Fusion™ Fresco and what it can do.

Fusion’s Fresco is a texturising powder you add to paint to create different textures and effects.

SEA SWEPT

Mix 1 part Fresco to 2 parts Fusion™ Mineral Paint with a whisk or a paint stir stick for approximately 30 seconds.

This will cause lumps and chucks in you thicken paint which is what you want. Apply it to your surface by brushing or stippling on and knock down and peaks that are too high ( this stuff drys hard ) when dry paint with you topcoat colour let dry, and wet sand to reveal down to the Fresco layer/texture.

Here is an example of this

CRACKLED HEAVY TEXTURE

Mix 1 part Fresco to 2 parts Fusion Mineral Paint.

 

Apply a thick (2-3mm) layer of mixture to your paint ready surface. Allow to set for 10-20 minutes. Knock down any heavy lumps by passing your brush over them. The heavier the texture the larger the cracks. Applying sunlight or heat will increase crackle effect.

FLAT MATTE CHALKY FINISH

Mix 1 part Fresco to 8 parts Fusion Mineral Paint.

 

1 Small Bag will make 2.5 Quarts or 5 Pints of Flat Matte Chalky Finish.

 

Apply mixture in various directions for a hand painted look immediately upon application. If any lumps occur, brush them out. If using the included scoop, add 4 scoops per Pint for this look. Add more or less as desired.

POLISHED PLASTER

I have been wanting to try this for a while now cause I’d like to have a polished plaster wall in my kitchen so I started testing a Lime Paint. While I was testing I posted about it on Instagram Stories ( you should follow me over there, you get to see behind the scenes ) and none other than Loree Pringle, Jennylyn’s mum and co-founder of Home Stead House Company ( Parent Company to Fusion Mineral Paint ) was watching and DM’d me to say if I added a bit more Fresco to Fusion I’d get a ‘sorta’ Lime Paint!

So that’s what I did and it took a while to get it right but I managed to get the Fresco’d paint to burnish and shine like glass!!  Wanna see?

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

Isn’t that just glorious?!

Like I said it took a bit to work out how to get it burnished like this, but once I sussed it out the process was pretty simple even if it was a bit laborious. For this piece, I used Little Lamb with lots of Fresco, in 2 separate pots I added the same mix but in one added some Farmhouse white Milk Paint, and in the other some Black Typewriter Milk Paint. I wanted some pigment streaks to show so I didn’t mix thoroughly.

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

Look how many different tones have been created.

Can you believe that it created all these tones! It was the process that added these different shades in and I was pleasantly surprised that they occurred naturally.

THE PROCESS

To achieve this look I applied the base colour of Little Lamb mixed with Fresco to the surface using a plastic scraper/spatula. I tried a metal one and that worked great too! a Japanese skip trowel would have made this a lot easier. Working in sections was the easiest way and when it was getting a little dry I scraped it off in areas and pasted it back on, essentially manipulating it, this left thick areas and thinner spots. I took a hairdryer and blasted it with some heat polishing it with a clean rag while it dried revealing the high shine spots.

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

Look at all that yummy texture!

The results were fab! I continued this process with the 2 other mixes. The thicker spots burnished to a glass-like sheen while the lowest points stayed matt. I was thrilled. I even managed to do a video tutorial on my YouTube page to show you how it all came together. You can watch that video tutorial by clicking HERE

THE FINISHED LOOK

I love love love how it turned out, and really glad Loree caught my Instagram story. Can you imagine this on a feature wall! wouldn’t it look amazing?

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

Love this rustic industrial look.

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

Fusion™ Fresco faux polished plaster

 

Leave a comment and let me know what you would use it on and what colours you would use. You can, of course, buy the full range of Fusion™ products here on my website by clicking this LINK

Sarah X

 

 

 

Painting with a Spray gun.

I have been using a spray gun for many years now and for me and my business, it’s a must-have tool. It cuts back on time and also leaves a smooth professional finish, there are Pro’s and Con’s to using one though and it’s not suitable for everything. One of the things it is great for, and the most popular reason people invest in one is chairs!! Now if you have ever hand painted a chair or 6 I needn’t explain any further…

PRO’s

  • It’s a time saver for large or multiple items.
  • Leaves a flawless smooth professional finish. Zero brushstrokes!
  • The units are portable and can be used for on-site work.
  • Quick and easy clean up.
  • Larger surfaces use less product.
  • Can be used to spray stains, undercoats and finishes.
  • applies an even coat to uneven surfaces like banister railings.
  • Gets into those hard to reach nooks and crannies.

CON’s

  •  Uses more product for items with lots of negative spaces like a chair.
  • Has a learning curve to get the smooth professional finish. ( I can help you with that!)
  • Extra saftey precautions are required.
  • All sprayers produce overspray, so using it in a booth or protected area is best.
  • Respirator is required.

Which one should I choose?

The HVLP sprayer is perfect for beginners and suitable for small projects and furniture refinishing. I have used one for over 6 years and I still bust that one out a lot… the only time I get the big guns out ( see what I did there! ;)) is for larger pieces or if I have to do more than one. HVLP stands for High Volume Low Pressure, these units are great for interiors as it creates very little over spray and leaves a smooth finish. It’s easy to set up and to clean up.

Air-compressor guns are great if you already own a compressor, all you need is a gun and a hose. If not it can be a pricey investment and I would encourage you to try the HVLP unit first. The set up and clean up are not difficult and are very similar to the HVLP. The finish is slightly better and you have more control with the fan pattern and output. The over spray is more than the electric so more prep taping and using drop clothes etc is needed.

Practice makes perfect!

When you get your sprayer practice practice practice! Find a nice clean wall outside and use water in your gun to get the output setting right and the spray pattern, it really helps with cutting down your over spray and getting the paint to come out in the right direction will give you better coverage. Holding the gun perpendicular to the surface you are working on is very important and ensures you have a an even dimple free finish. You need to work at a consistent speed to create an even spraying pattern.

Spraying Fusion™

All water based and some oil base paints can be used in these two types of sprayers and I have used lots of different ones. Fusion is already at a perfect viscosity to put straight through without watering down so good news for all your Fusion fans! Chalk paint is too thick and will need to be thinned by approx 10% just add some water and away you go. This will come more easier the more you practice. Go have some fun!

I have just recorded a video on Paint Spraying 101 just some tips and tricks to setting it up spraying and clean up. You can purchase that video here.

These are the affiliate links to the sprayers I recommend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gravity fed gun in action!

Just a couple seconds of video showing you the gravity fed compressor gun.

I hope this has been helpful I know when I was thinking of buying one the options were overwhelming. The video I have put together is also something I wished I’d had so I’m hoping you’ll find that valuable too.  If you are like me and need a visual grab the video and get spraying!!

Sarah X

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer.

How to apply an I.O.D. decor transfer. We have been a stockist of I.O.D decor transfers for a while now and they have proved very popular. They are lots of ways you can bling up your furniture but none as unique and easy as this!

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer.

The transfers come in different sizes from a small plant pot transfers to big enough to fit a large dresser. There are typography and vintage images, all designed by Sally and Josie the sisters and designers behind Iron Orchid Designs. Their talents don’t end there! they have designed Vintage decor stamps  and Vintage art deco moulds. We did a Facebook LIVE in How to paint like a Pro Facebook group. Join the group and search #LIVE to see loads of Pro’s sharing tips, tricks, and tutorials. You can join by clicking here.

 

Appling the transfer.

The transfer needs to be applied to a matte paint for best results, so Fusion Mineral Paint or MMS Milk Paint is perfect for this. We prepped a piece of pine board we had hanging about and gave it a coat of Raw Silk and dry brushed some Putty over for a weathered look.

Once dry we picked our transfer, we choose the design Farmers Market to make farmhouse style kitchen sign. When you take the transfer out of the packet it comes with an instruction leaflet and a wooden stick to rub/transfer the design from the clear plastic sheet to your project.

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

The transfer comes on a clear plastic sheet with a waxed backing paper to protect it. When you have decided where to put the design slowly peel the wax backing paper off being careful not to peel any of the design away.  The transfers are very delicate and almost immediately adheres to the surface so can’t be moved once in place.

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

Transfering to your project.

Once the transfer is where you want it, use some tape to keep it in place. Lightly rub the transfer to push it against the surface and grab your stick. You want to rub with a little bit of pressure over every bit of the design so you burnish the design off the clear plastic onto the surface.

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

As you are burnishing/rubbing the design you will start to see it change to a lighter colour, you can see it leaving the clear plastic and sticking to your project! that looks like this.

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

When this look is achieved all over, gently peel back the plastic and take a peek to make sure the whole design is stuck down. If there is a piece that hasn’t stuck, just lay the clear sheet back down and rub a bit harder. It really is that simple.

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

 

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer

Finishing

It’s almost done! you need to lay your hand flat over the design and rub gently to make sure the design has laid flat to the surface and no bits are sticking up. If you want to distress the design for that vintage look, now is the time to do it! a high grit like 320 upwards should do the trick. If it’s not going to be used in a high traffic area, you don’t have to seal it but the transfers can be sealed if you desire. Wax, Hemp Oil or a Poly/varnish will work and keep it protected.

Don’t forget these transfers can be used on glass, mirror or walls! just make sure the surface you are applying it to is clean and free from any grease. I.O.D decor transfers are available in the shop section of our website.

We would just like to say a massive thank you to Mandy Alexander of Alexander photograph for the fab pics X you can check out her Facebook page here.

How to apply an I.O.D decor transfer.

Hope you found this helpful

Sarah X

 

 

What’s the difference? Milk Paint, Chalk Paint & Mineral Paint.

What's the difference

 

What’s the difference?

What’s the difference? We get asked that every single day at the shop and I think it surprises people to know that there is a big difference between them. All are used for furniture, Interiors and more and all can be found up and down the UK ( and across the world ) in Independent shops and from online retailers.

 Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint

Let’s start with Milk Paint, this is the odd one out in this crowd as it comes in powder form all sealed in a pretty little package. It is mixed with water in equal proportions to make a thin single cream like consistency. (Click to see how easy it is!) It gives you an unrivaled flat smooth brush free finish but is also famous for it’s ‘Chippy’ look. Milk Paint is a porous paint, meaning it needs sealing with a top coat.

 

smooth finish mmsmp

smooth finish achieved with Bonding Agent

 

Milk Paint is very versatile and you can get lots of different effects with minimal effort. It can be used as a wood stain by adding more water or will naturally crackle if applied thickly. It can be used as a wash, to tone down a vibrant colour or as a glaze to highlight nooks and crannies. The famous ‘Chippy’ look is simply achieved by painting a prefinished or an already painted piece something that’s slightly shiny, the milk paint will resist the already finished surface producing the authentic chips of peeling paint….vintage heaven.

 

Antique French cabinet painted in MMSMP 'Mora' with a lovely Chippy finish

Antique French cabinet painted in MMSMP ‘Mora’ with a lovely Chippy finish.

 

What is Milk Paint?

So now we know the basics of what it can do, what the heck is it? Milk Paint has been around for century’s and has been used for many things from ancient cave paintings, drawings on the pyramids to more recently used for Barns and as a raw wood paint.

It’s made from just 5 all natural ingredients including milk protein ( casein ) Limestone, Clay, Chalk and natural pigments….. that’s it! It’s bio-degradable, no VOC’s, mold resistant and makes a breathable coating so it’s great for lime plastered walls and other surfaces. Milk paints eco-friendly formula makes it a safe option for asthma and chemically sensitive people.

Finishes.

I have already mentioned that Milk Paint is a porous paint and needs to be sealed to be ‘finished’ and there are many ways to do that. Hemp Oil is a solvent free oil finish and protects and seals by absorbing into the wood and hardening to make a water resistant seal. It brings out the richness of the colour and drys to a low luster sheen. It can not be chipped off or peel as it doesn’t leave a surface film.

Hemp Oil is food safe and can be used on chopping boards, kitchen counters etc, it can also be used to bring life back to old cast iron, stone, and bare wood! ….it is basically magic in a bottle!! I’m addicted I literally try and find things in my house to oil.

 

Hemp Oil on Milk Paint and Bare Wood.

Hemp Oil on Milk Paint and Bare Wood.

 

Wax is also a great finish for Milk Paint and Miss Mustard Seed’s Wax is amazing, it’s soft and buttery and has virtually no odor and is made from beeswax and a little carnauba. It is a fine museum quality and is simple and easy to use unlike some others on the market, it drys to a low luster with no harsh sheen. Wax brings out the richness of the colour and provides a water resistant finish. Miss Mustard Seed has a range of waxes including Antiquing, white and beeswax.

 

MMSMP Tough Coat is a water-based non-yellowing wipe on poly, it’s perfect for high-traffic areas such as table tops. It can be brushed on or wiped on and I use it a lot for bleed through (bonus). When you achieve a ‘chippy’ finish and you don’t want any more chipping (which can happen over time) a coat of tough coat seals in the paint chips and leaves a nice matte finish. Easy water clean up.

 

chippy finish sealed with tough coat.

chippy finish sealed with Tough Coat.

 

Chalk Paint.

Chalk paint comes ready to use in a can. It has a reputation for being a no-prep paint ( although some prep is alway required even if it’s only a good clean!). It has a thick consistency and can be used in lots of different ways to get different effects. It can be allowed to thicken to make texture, watered down to make a paint wash and a dye for fabric. It is a porous paint and needs to be sealed. Wax is the preferred method to seal Chalk Paint although it can be sealed with a varnish or poly water-based top coat. We only use Chalk Paint if a customer specifically asks for it on a custom job now and never ever wax it, we always seal with a water based varnish. It is easily distressed and is often use for Shabby Chic style painting. We stock GraceMary Chalk & Clay Paint at our shop, it’s water based and VOC free and it has a matt finish that is harder wearing than other brands of chalk paint on the market. It has a fantastic colour palette and a clear and dark wax in the range. Chalk Paint is easy water clean up.

 

GraceMary chalk paint.

GraceMary chalk paint.

 

Fusion Mineral Paint.

Fusion Mineral Paint is the big daddy, the grande finale, the piste de resistance!

It truly is the best one step paint on the market, a professional paint for the DIY’er,  it’s an acrylic base paint and natural minerals making it UV stable and eco-friendly, only the finest ingredients are used to achieve that perfect flawless matte finish. It comes ready to use straight from the 30% recycled clear plastic containers through which you can see the gorgeous colours, all 52 of them. It has a thinner consistency than chalk paint but exceptional coverage. It is zero VOC’s, unrivaled durability and drum roll, please …… no top coat is needed! yes, you read that right! no top coat required! why?  I hear you ask, well because it’s an acrylic based paint it is waterproof when dry! yes waterproof so the only reason for you to add wax or glaze is for decorative purposes. So if you hate waxing but love the matte chalky look this is the perfect paint for you.

Fusion Mineral Paint is easy water clean up.

 

Fusion Mineral Paint (1)

Fusion Mineral Paint

 

Fusion is very versatile, it’s perfect for the contemporary flawless solid coverage and can just as easily be distressed for the vintage vibe. As its name suggests it fuses itself to the surface and is very tough when dry so if you are thinking of distressing your piece it’s best to be done soon after the paint drys. It does require some prep work though, so if your piece is shiny a light ‘key’ with sandpaper or our fabulous Sandi Hands is good enough. The only thing Fusion won’t adhere to is Wax, so if the piece you are going to paint has a wax finish you would need to wipe down with white spirits and lightly sand.

 

Midnight Blue contemporary look.

Midnight Blue contemporary look.

 

 Finishes and accents.

With so many different D.I.Y paints on the market, we know it can difficult to make the right choice for you and your project. So Fusion Mineral Paint has made it easy! they have made a premium paint, luxurious finishes and everything in-between.

We are trained and highly knowledgeable on all the products in the range so any queries and question you might have can be answered. Fusion Mineral Paint have such a diverse collection of products that it makes us a one -stop shop! no more running around trying to find a finishing or a prep product we carry them all under one roof! and of course, you can purchase them all in our on-line shop.
Some of the products available from Fusion

Some of the products available from Fusion

So what’s the verdict?

The conclusion we can take from all this is no one paint does everything, we need to know the pro’s and con’s and decide what is best for our projects before we go ahead. Reading customer reviews is always a good start when trying a new product. I have put together an infographic for a quick tick list for you to check which paint will work for you and your project.

So what is the difference?

Painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Interior of the car.

Painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Um yeh, I know it’s absurd! and right off I’d like to say that Fusion Mineral Paint was designed as a furniture paint. But the product is excellent and hardwearing and can be used on so many surfaces, so I’ll explain how we got our weirdest commission ….to date 😉

A few posts ago we did an interior revamp for a lovely client and ended up painting her leather armchair. It no longer went with her design and it was headed for the local landfill, so we thought why not! fast forward to a couple weeks ago and her husband who is a car dealer asked if we could spruce up the leather interior of a Mercedes convertible. You see he sits on that leather armchair night after night, the kids jump on it and so does the dog. His thinking was that if the paint held up to all that it should work just great in the car.

We explained to him that it wasn’t meant for this purpose and we couldn’t guarantee that it would have a long life, but he decided he wanted to go ahead.

Here is a before of the car interior.

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Seat with yellow insert

Prep 

We were asked to paint all the yellow parts of the interior, and he decided he wanted to go black. The seats we knew would be easy and durable but the dash board etc was made of a combintion of rubber type material and plastic.

It took a bit of time to prep and tape everything up, it was cleaned and prepped with a lttle sanding using our fabulous Sandi Hands. They came in useful in the hard to reach areas.

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint

It’s all in the prep work

 

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

masking the door panels.

 

It probably took just as long to prep as it did to paint, but this wasnt the type of job you could just start over.

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Hard at work

Starting the fun part.

Once all the prep was done and we were sure we had masked everything, it was time to start painting. We were so excited! and at one point we had maybe 5 men all standing around the car, arms folded shaking their heads and mumbling under their breath! sooo funny.

It took about 2-3 coats all over, a variety of different brushes were used including a roller for the leather seats.

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

First coat applied with a roller.

 

painting a car with Fusion Mineral Paint.

centre panel being painted.

Everything was given one to two thin coats the first day and left overnight. The third coat is were it all started coming together.

painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Looks better even after one coat!

 

painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint

The dashboard and door inserts after 3 light coats.

 

The car had to be kept inside on day 2 as it was raining and we needed the roof down , so the pics could be better but I think even in this light it’s clear there is a massive improvment.

painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

nearly done, just the tape to remove and touch ups to be done.

 

After the 3 light coat the tape was removed and a few touch ups done and it was ready! We are dissapointed we haven’t got a beauty shot with the car all washed in some pretty location, but the weather had been real bad and before it cleared up the dealer sold it !

painting a car interior wit Fusion Mineral Paint.

Still drying but a huge improvement from the banana yellow.

 

painting a car interior with Fusion Mineral Paint.

Finishing touch ups done.

 

In the picture above the chairs are still drying but the centre panels and dash has dryed to a lovely matte finish. It was a intricate job but we really enjoyed the challenge.

We often say in our trade that we would ‘paint anything’ and now we can tick a car off the list.

We would love to hear what you think , leave a coment and let us know.

Sarah x

 

to see the leather armchair painted in Fusion Mineral paint click here.

Painting leather with Fusion Mineral Paint

 

A quick tutorial Silver gilded Angel wings.

A quick tutorial Silver gilded Angel wings.

With Christmas coming up we have a special item arrive in store, it’s perfect for home decor or just for Christmas. Angel wings.

We have a local carpenter who makes us these angel wings in a couple different sizes, they have been very popular and we can barely keep a pair in the shop for a couple days!  This time-lapse video shows the gilding process and glazing. I used Fusion Mineral paint clear glaze and Fusion’s Coal, which is the black in the classic range.

Both are available to buy in our online shop.

A quick tutorial Silver gilded Angel wings.

Fusion Clear Glaze

 

A quick tutorial Silver gilded Angel wings.

Fusion Coal black.

 

 

The wings were painted first with Fusion Fresco and Coal, Fresco is a texturizing medium, a powder that you add to the paint to give it body, it can be used to make paint have chalky or very chunky and textured finish !! it’s very exciting and I’ll be posting about that very soon. The Angel wings will also be available to purchase very soon on our online shop, yay!

 

 

Sarah xx

Painting leather with Fusion Mineral Paint

Painting leather with Fusion Mineral Paint.
We have a lovely client whom we helped on a huge interior job a little while back. We helped with lighting flooring, obviously furniture and some accessories too. We had a blast sourcing her very specific furniture requirements, one of which was an industrial vintage style table and chairs, we struggled to find exactly what she wanted but did come up with some ‘out of the box’ ideas. Take a look, what do you think ? is it not fabulous? doesn’t it look like a magazine article?

We sourced an original BierKeler table and matching benches and grey washed the very orange wood, we sealed it with Polyvine dead flat varnish and it looks amazing.

That was the dining room the other end of the room, the living room end is where we had some fun.
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